|||| 8 - 15 nov 2014 ||||
7DFPS ...
About
Name
Cheeseness
Timezone
Australia/Hobart -- (GMT+10:00) Hobart
Website
http://cheesetalks.twolofbees.com/cheese
Coolness
100% cool
Games
more...

12

10

Dance
A non-combative first person puzzle/strategy game (updated August 21st, 7th day build in description).
more...

7

4

Haunt
An asymmetric multiplayer survival game by the SteamLUG community
Posts
more...

3

1

First Screenshot!
At first, it sounds mad that it's taken 4 months to get to this point, but in-game screenshot support isn't something that's been a high priority for me. It's been difficult to find time to focus on Winter's Wake, but since my last post, I have managed to achieve a few bits and pieces that get the game closer to the kind of experience I want to convey. This includes:
  • Stereo positional audio support
  • Scene transitions
  • Timed events
  • Vertical orientation indicator (there's a placeholder "viewcone" type indicator in the screenshot above)
  • Mac support
  • Windows support
  • Action indicator icons
  • Screenshot support
Note that the game already ran and will always run on Linux first - that's my development platform :) There've also been a bunch of refactoring/structure changes that I've made along the way, and Henry has been on-and-off working on additional puzzle logic support (which I'm hoping to tidy up and integrate this weekend). In the short term, once the puzzle logic system is behaving well enough, I'll switch to focus on getting the game's first act up and happening for an early tech demo. From there, I'll probably move onto supporting additional input devices. I'm also planning to spend time making small single scene tests which re-create worthy locations from games, films and books as an exercise in exploring what aspects convey a sense of recognisable space. This should also help me refine my workflows and improve content creation tools. There's a bunch more UI functionality that I'd like to enhance and polish up, and a few unknown areas such as interactive dialogue that I need to dedicate time to assessing the viability of (they're super prominent in adventure games, but the UI that I'm building is necessarily simple to a point where selecting dialogue options will be tricky). One thing that the past four months have highlighted to me have been that there are too many other activities in my life for me to be able to give game development the kind of attention I'd like to, so I'm in the process of rebalancing things to allow me to focus on getting Winter's Wake ready for release. Part of this might involve a crowdfunding campaign, but I won't be able to push ahead with that until I can clearly demonstrate the type of gameplay and experiences I'm aiming to provide.
more...

2

1

Hover Drive: A 1 Day First Person Game (sources + slideshow available)
  • Post 1 (start of 7DFPS)
  • Post 2 (end of 7DFPS)
  • Bonus Post (this post)
  • Post 3 (first screenshot)
This weekend, I gave a talk for my local LUG on creating a simple game from scratch using SDL2 and OpenGL. I had hoped that my 7DFPS text adventure would be the focus of this talk, but since it's still a little way off (I've continued development past 7DFPS, but it's still not quite at a point where I feel it can speak for itself - stay tuned though, I'm hoping to have some early builds up within the next week or so), I switched gears and spent Friday using the things I've learned whilst working on my 7DFPS game to make something new. In addition to first person camera controls, I wanted to cover 3D translation and rotation so that I could talk about the way that OpenGL handles these. Rather than focusing on first person movement, I decided to do a little radio controlled car sim, where players would move a vehicle through a scene whilst watching from a fixed viewpoint. As it came together, I realised that I hadn't bothered to stop the car - at this point it was a blue block - from turning when its speed was zero. Instead of fixing that, I embraced it and decided to make the vehicle a hovercraft (which also made modeling a little easier). In the course of about 7 hours, the game was more or less in the state it's in now. Save for the OBJ loader and a half dozen lines in the middle of the rendering function which I copied from my text adventure, everything was written on the Friday. I knocked the 3D assets together in around an hour in Blender, pulled a fan sound from Freesound.org, and used a super funky track by Kevin MacLeod, and the little game went from being a bunch of floating cubes to something more interesting. For the talk, I gave an overview of what SDL2 and OpenGL are, focusing on windowing, input and rendering, did a brief code walkthrough and then talked about planning and game design as people had some hands on time with this and several other games I've made. All up, Hover Drive is a long way shy of a finished game (and it's got a fairly significant bug with rendering normals that nobody seemed to notice on the day), but it sufficed for the talk I gave, and it was a bunch of fun to work on. The source code (with comments!), Blender source files and the slideshow I gave my talk against are all up on Hover Drive's GitHub page, along with builds for Linux and Windows which should have all of the deps that aren't likely to be installed on an OS by default. I'll have a Mac build up as soon as I sort out my MBA's busted GCC install. Surprisingly, the game seems to be more enjoyable in its current state than I expected it to be. Even without collisions, environmental variation, objectives and other things that I feel a game like this would need, people seem to just enjoy driving around. I guess that's why people buy radio controlled cars :D
more...

2

3

So, Where's That Text Adventure?
When the concept for a first person text adventure popped into my head, it felt like a good fit for 7DFPS - a different approach to the concept of a first person game that was a step outside of the sorts of things I'd done before. Aware of the technology problems that faced me last year, I started looking at options much earlier, taking a couple of different approaches and trying to prototype up the kind of experience I wanted to explore with this game (these prototypes had very little content to them and focused more on trying to reduce the number of technical unknowns than trying to make the game and were super minimal) so that I could focus on implementation and content development during the event. I had planned to write a slew of blog posts during development, looking at interface and presentation decisions, the differences between interpreting text and visuals, puzzle design and the insights that came with that and a few other bits and pieces. Unfortunately, as it turned out, accross the 7DFPS week, I had my day job go into crunch mode ahead of a presentation of a new platform we've been developing, two companies that I do community stuff with/for decided to launch products, and assorted other minor distractions which I would have appreciated not having to deal with (including having my left thumb bitten down to the bone by my cat o/ ). These additional pressures made it harder for me to keep track of my team, and it wasn't until Thursday night that I realised that I'd need to switch gears from writing and scene creation to help out on the engine development side. I haven't had chance to do a proper count, but it looks like we have 4 minutes or so worth of fantastic music composed by Anton, nearly 100 recorded foley samples by lindar, maybe 2,000 lines of code from Henry (not counting stuff I've done myself), and over 7,500 words' worth of content (from location descriptions alone) that I've written myself. In addition, there are numerous supporting documents and diagrams looking at scene layouts, puzzle structure, plot, and so forth. The past 48 hours have been an exciting journey and one that I'd like to write more about, but I think that for the moment, my time is better spent pushing ahead. I'm committed to this project and intend to see it through. Hopefully along the way, I'll have more time to write about the project, and maybe have a build ready before the itch.io submission time expires!
more...

3

2

A Thirst For Adventure
Warning: Walls of text ahead! If you don't like reading, my game is probably not going to be of interest :D One of the things I love most about 7DFPS is the breadth of creativity and diversity that participants explore. Seeing so much variation in what people can envision and express a FPS game to be really demonstrates that even in one of the most saturated "genres", human creativity is able to bring something special. I like to think of the event as an opportunity to approach development, design and production from angles outside of my comfort zone. With FLAT in 2012, we explored unique movement mechanics and a reimagining of old-school sprite based FPS visuals, and in 2013, I attempted to create an atmospheric and compelling first person puzzle game with Dance (with varying degrees of success). Stepping outside the familiar is what defines adventure - the opportunity to explore the unknown and discover not secrets both external and internal. This year, I had a few concepts to chose from. Early in the year, my running favourites were a first person giant monster brawler where players would leap from planet to planet, colliding mid-orbit and causing interstellar mayhem, and a first person runner/cinematic platformer hybrid involving the use of multiple cameras. Whilst both of those are ideas I'd love to come back to, something else came up in the meantime that caused me to shift focus and look towards something both more and less ambitious. For 7DFPS 2014, I'll be working on a first person text adventure, drawing inspiration from older text and hypertext adventures like Portal (1986) and graphic adventures such as The Secret Of Monkey Island (1990) and Quest For Glory (1989), as well as more modern text oriented titles like Kentucky Route Zero (2013) and The Entertainment (2013). There's something special and fundamentally different about environments, characters and stories that people read (rather than see). I think that people who immerse themselves in worlds that their imaginations have in-part created are more connected to them, and that's the kind of experience I'm hoping we'll be able to provide in a new an interesting way (more on that in a later post). Joining me on this journey are Henry (my Dad, who assisted with some movement logic during Dance's development) and Anton (who scored FLAT's soundtrack), as well as peripheral contributors Lumi and Syd. Henry will be focusing on most of the engine development. Earlier this year, he and I had spent time prototyping the kind of experience that we'd like to convey with this game using JMonkeyEngine, and he has been hard at work over the past week assembling a framework in C++ using SDL and OpenGL based on the insights we'd learned from prototyping. If all goes well, that work will be mostly finished by the time the 7DFPS week starts, putting us on-par with those who've chosen to use pre-existing engines for the jam. Anton will be looking after the game's score. I had a blast working with him on FLAT and look forward to seeing what he is able to bring to this game in terms of atmosphere. Without visuals, music will be a key element in creating and conveying mood. In addition to designing the core experience, I've been spending the past month or so planning out the narrative flow and puzzle structure of the game so that during the 7DFPS week, I can focus on implementation and content creation (and so that Anton has what he needs to be able to hit the ground running). Lumi was originally hoping to contribute environmental and incidental audio effects, though unfortunately her availability is uncertain. She's still keen to help out in small ways though. My long-time cohort Syd is also likely to lend a hand with puzzle design and be her awesome supportive self across the 7DFPS week. Right now, my biggest uncertainties are probably technology based. Since none of the engines we looked at were a good match for what we need, and since our needs are few, but specific, we decided to roll our own engine so as to give us the greatest control and flexibility over what we're working with. Even using our prototypes as reference, there's still a bit of unknown involved, and any hurdles will end up impacting on our bottom line (with the main constraint being time, of course). Having a person dedicated to engine work definitely helps take a bit of pressure off here, and should make it easier to respond to any implementation issues that arise during development without slowing down work in other areas. The other thing I'm unsure of is environmental audio. Without visuals, environmental effects (along with music) are going to be critical in providing a sense of space. They're also going to provide valuable orientation cues which will help counteract the inherently disorienting nature of exploring spaces without visual reference. Having a dedicated person here definitely would have eased most of my concerns, but I think we'll still be able to get through it, and there's always the option of bringing someone else onboard. I also have no idea what we're going to call this thing :D Whilst the player won't see any 3D environments, we're aiming to have positional audio, and will be using 3D scenes to raycast against to determine what scene elements a player is "looking" at. I'm really torn on whether to show WIP stuff of these "visual" elements that won't end up being shown in the game. On one hand, I love the idea of being open, but on the other, I'd hate to predispose or undermine the way that players will imagine the world that we're creating. I'm leaning towards showing stuff but prefixing posts with a warning, recommending that people read them after playing the game. At any rate, I can't wait to see what we're able to come up with across the 7DFPS week. Best of luck to my team and to everybody else out there who's planning to make something! - Cheese
Hearted Games
Found none!
Hearted Posts
Found none!
7DFPS brought to you by Sven Bergstrom & Sos Sosowski & Jan Willem Nijman | Logo by Cactus Follow news and info about 7DFPS on twitter Games hosted on itch.io